Alzheimer's Gene

Living With Alzheimer's

Is There An Alzheimers Gene

The search for the genetic roots of Alzheimer’s disease has consumed medical science for some time and the discovery of more than one Alzheimers gene has helped advance the understanding of the illness. Simply put, there are some cases of Alzheimer’s disease that are driven by genetic traits passed down from one generation to another. As a consequence, it is now possible to test for an Alzheimers gene so you can take the necessary precautions to combat the onset of the disease should the results warn you that you are genetically predisposed.

As of mid-2011, there are a total of 5 Alzheimers genes discovered that could be responsible for as much as 5% of genetically inherited Alzheimer’s cases. Three of these genes are located on chromosomes 1, 14, and 21 and are thought to advance early-onset Alzheimers. The remaining 2 Alzheimers genes, on the other hand, are thought to be responsible for late-onset Alzheimers with symptoms manifesting at age 55 and higher.

The first step to knowing whether you have an Alzheimers gene that causes an early or late onset of the disease is to undergo genetic testing. Here, doctors map out your chromosomes looking for the genes that result in the development of the Alzheimer's. If these genes are found, it does not almost always mean that patients will develop the disease, although the probability for that occurring is then considerably higher.

As a result, doctors will normally ask patients to adjust their lifestyle to help manage, delay, or even prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Consider the following common recommendations for fighting an Alzheimers gene:

Is There An Alzheimers Gene

The search for the genetic roots of Alzheimer’s disease has consumed medical science for some time and the discovery of more than one Alzheimers gene has helped advance the understanding of the illness. Simply put, there are some cases of Alzheimer’s disease that are driven by genetic traits passed down from one generation to another. As a consequence, it is now possible to test for an Alzheimers gene so you can take the necessary precautions to combat the onset of the disease should the results warn you that you are genetically predisposed.

As of mid-2011, there are a total of 5 Alzheimers genes discovered that could be responsible for as much as 5% of genetically inherited Alzheimer’s cases. Three of these genes are located on chromosomes 1, 14, and 21 and are thought to advance early-onset Alzheimers. The remaining 2 Alzheimers genes, on the other hand, are thought to be responsible for late-onset Alzheimers with symptoms manifesting at age 55 and higher.

The first step to knowing whether you have an Alzheimers gene that causes an early or late onset of the disease is to undergo genetic testing. Here, doctors map out your chromosomes looking for the genes that result in the development of the Alzheimer's. If these genes are found, it does not almost always mean that patients will develop the disease, although the probability for that occurring is then considerably higher.

As a result, doctors will normally ask patients to adjust their lifestyle to help manage, delay, or even prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Consider the following common recommendations for fighting an Alzheimers gene: